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Colour scheme accentuates building’s original architectural detailing in a contemporary way

Connecting past and present, the fully restored heritage building in a prominent position in The Crossing retail and office precinct features a quiet Resene palette

The 1935 heritage facade that stands as a architecture, building, city, commercial building, daytime, downtown, house, landmark, metropolis, metropolitan area, mixed use, neighbourhood, real estate, residential area, sky, street, town, transport, urban area, blue
The 1935 heritage facade that stands as a central feature of The Crossing retail and office hub has been fully restored and repainted with a Resene colour scheme that accentuates the building’s original architectural detailing in a contemporary way.

The Crossing retail and office hub, developed by Carter Group and designed by Wilson and Hill Architects, combines a variety of architectural forms – some historic and some brand new.

Design architect Stuart Hay says that as part of anchoring The Crossing within the city’s history, the 1935 heritage facade on the corner of Cashel Mall and Colombo Street was restored and reinforced.

“We chose colours from the Resene range that enhanced the historic architectural features of the facade, but in a contemporary manner,” says Hay.Window frames, panels, trim and keystones are in Resene Half Merino – a light off-white; wall trim, columns, the parapet and steel supports in Resene Nero – a deep, inky-blue black; and the remainder of the walls in Resene Trojan – a mid-tone grey.

“We chose Resene for its enduring paint quality and broad range – and also for the great on-site support provided during the restoration,” says Hay.For details, visit a Resene ColorShop, freephone 0800 RESENE (737 363), online: www.resene.co.nz


Story by: Trendsideas

19 Apr, 2020

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